The ResilientDad blog has moved!

It’s taken me some time to figure out the move but I think things are fully operational now at MakeResilient.com. This is important to me as this means a commitment to continuing the blog on a higher level for me. I am focusing on creating new content for living a resilient lifestyle amidst the changes we are facing in this new industrial revolution or the automation revolution as some have dubbed it. I’ve set up a sort of editorial calendar to keep me ahead of blog topics and what needs to be drafted or researched. Lots to learn, but if there is anything I like about this path, it is the continuous learning process.

New posts have already been added to the new site over at MakeResilient.com. If you liked the material here in ResilientDad, I’m working hard to making them better over at MakeResilient. Thank you!watson

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Finding a house fit for resilience

My family and I have been planning on buying a house and hope to do so in the next few months. There are a lot of things to consider in buying a house,these are some of the more unconventional considerations I have. These may rage against what your broker will say, but then again, these are unconventional ideas for unconventional times.

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I do not get too hung up on the school district.

My wife hates this, but I do not believe the public school system will be as prominent in the future. The flaws in the school system has been made more obvious with the surge of entrepreneurship-and people are realizing that school only teaches kids to be wage slaves. There is a massive growth in alternative schooling and public schools are being shut down all over the country.
If your home value is tied to the local school district, then your value goes down when they do. BUT your taxes will probably remain the same.

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The city should have a good local, robust economy

We are not looking at distant cities, but just those around us. We scouted some ideal locations a few weeks back-however after checking out the city info, it turns out they have a couple of large universities in the area. This is not an issue by itself, but this may mean the local economy is tied to the college (probably is). My issue there is the future of the university as a thriving institution. Fore more info, Google “student loan bubble”.
A few other considerations are:
  • is the area dependent on manufacturing jobs which might be automated? 
  • Are there large retail areas which are showing signs of decay? 
  • Are there signs of rezoning for apartment construction?
  • How much land is still undeveloped?
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The city should not have regulations about homesteading

A few cities in my area-including my current one-have restrictions to owning livestock in the backyard. If we are not purchasing a large lot, if we are staying in the suburbs, I at least need to be free to have some type of livestock. As an example, it turns out that most cities we looked at only allow 2 chickens.
This ties to my plans for gardening also. I plan to have a good sized, producing garden in my yard. I do not want any restrictions on rain catchment or water storage or where I can install a trellis. These things don’t sound important-until you realize that you cannot build them.

No HOAs

I do not want to be burdened by my neighbor’s preferences. I do not want to fund their authority to dictate to others or to myself. Do not talk to me about property values-I plan to address those from a higher vantage point that does not need the HOA as an excuse to exist.
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Distance is not as big an issue

Travel distance is still an issue but it may notbe as big. With the predicted arrival of autonomous cars, it will be easier to commute a 20 mile distance to the office. Plus the fact that telecommuting will be a more common part of most jobs in the future. The 20 mile commute may even be a very pleasing experience, where one gets to escape from the humdrum tasks and focus on personal leisure-like writing or reading. You will of course still need to consider the time to commute, as that would be time away from the family. But, with robocars and telecommuting you have a lot of options compared to how things used  to be.
So there you go, a short list of things I consider when we look for a house. These may sound contrary to most advice from real estate professionals-this is just my list. You will need to do some research on the concerns above. You can read more of it here but I really suggest doing your own research as new information comes up on these issues on almost a daily basis.
Do the research, form your opinions and discuss it with your family. What are your goals for the home in the next 5 years? In the next 10? To me, a few of the items above are critical so I need to be prepared to talk about it with my family.
Do you have other suggestions? Please help a guy out in finding that home he can really set roots in.

Family safety tips for long distance traveling

The holidays are upon us, and like most families, we embark on a long drive to visit our loved ones. In our case the travel is from Texas to Kansas, approx 450 miles. We’ve gotten better at getting organized for these trips (we typically have a few every year). As we learn more about these trips, they get easier and more comfortable. I actually look forward to these nowadays. Here are some things we did on a recent Thanksgiving trip. I hope you find some of these ideas useful.

Vehicle prep

Days before the trip itself, I slowly purge the vehicle of any clutter. On the day of our trip, when we are loading, the vehicle is ready and you basically start with a clean slate. The trunk is empty, the glove compartment and the console between the 2 frontseats is empty. This gives me a psychological boost and a countdown to the day of the trip. It also helps me to visualize what is needed in the car.
Check the vehicle for any maintenance needed. Depending on vehicle upkeep you may need to do more. In my case, I needed to air the tires. Others to check for are wiper fluids, oil and coolant. The vehicle we used for this trip was a lease so it was pretty well maintained.
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Fill up the gas tank ahead. I filled up the tank on Wed night, since we were leaving early AM on Thursday. This saves me from having to gas up at 5am and have to worry about how safe the gas station might be. It also makes our trip more fluid when we leave. Small disruptions during the first 2 hours of the trip really slow us down as it prevents us from building momentum.

Family stuff for the trip

We planned days earlier on what we were bringing. We had agreed on easy to cook meals so that we save prep time at our destination. This meant we allocated a big cooler for all frozen food we were taking with us. We had a separate cooler for our meals during the trip-this is super helpful if your kids have specific diets like ours do. This cooler does not go in the trunk, but is kept within reach of the passenger seat.
We pack enough supplies so we are self sustained during our trip and while we are at our relatives’ place.
We rely quite a bit on ipads and phones to keep our kiddos busy on the road. Having phone chargers and a way to charge multiple devices are important. We have an inverter in our vehicle-which allows us to charge usb, 110 volt items, 12 volt devices (like GPS). We also saved some videos onto our devices, in case internet is slow or unavailable.
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Inflight entertainment
We load the vehicle while it is in the garage with the garage door closed. We do not want to show passers by in the street that we were leaving on a big trip. We woke up early for any last minute preps and loaded up. Kids woke up last and were the last to get loaded in the car-this lets them sleep thru the first few hours of the trip.

Weather check

This goes without saying-check road conditions before the trip. Usually we drive thru one or two thunderstorms every time we go thru Oklahoma. Our return trip would be rainy. We get dressed for this so when we take bathroom breaks we are ready.

Home security

Before we left the house obviously we double check that all doors are locked and no appliance is left on that is not needed. For security, we leave the porch lights on. I also set up lights and a radio so that they turn on at night so as to simulate activity in the house. I use an appliance timer I got from home depot and to this I plugged in lights for a bedroom-so that it is seen from the front yard and street. I also plugged in a radio so that it can be heard throughout the house and when you approach the front door. From the backyard, one can see light within the house from the bedroom.
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If you have a paid home security service, that works too. However I like the idea of making my house seem occupied with or without a security service. Also, I have heard some rather disappointing stories about how these systems work. They are more passive than active basically. I consider my lights+radio on timers more of an active deterrent.
Update:There is also a product called FakeTV which makes your home seem occupied with somebody watching TV. I have not personally tried this but folks have said great things about it.

Bathroom breaks and stopping for gas

During the trip, all doors are always locked and windows are closed. Particularly when we stop for gas or food, doors are always locked. If I leave the car for gas, I ask my wife to stay alert and keep the doors locked (our vehicle automatically unlocks when the driver leaves the car so she has to manually lock it).
I cannot emphasize this enough. I have seen way too many car jacks because the victims
We are careful when we stop for bathroom breaks. There are way too many truck stops on our route and we sometimes end up in undesirable areas. In general, these stops have risks to them because it is very easy for a child to be lost/abducted and taken away. There are too many strangers just passing by and there are vehicles leaving the area every second.
When my wife goes to the bathroom she makes sure to have her phone and her pepper spray with her. I take note how long she is gone. When I take a break I have my phone and ccw with me. Since having my pistol with me on these trips, I feel way better equipped to protect my family in case something bad happens. I highly advise being armed when traveling. We are working to get my wife her ccw permit also, but for now at least I am prepared and provide this extra layer of safety for the family.
Since we travel with kids, I try to have an empty bottle of water ready for those super emergency bathroom breaks for my son. Sometimes we do not make it to a rest stop. This allows us to just stay in the car while being pulled over somewhere (safe and away from the highway please).
When we stop for gas, I try to pick a spot that is favorable to my safety. No dark areas, away from other vehicles and preferably a spot that lets me get a good view of my surroundings. This does not mean isolated areas, just something that allows a good vantage point. Sometimes this means avoiding the middle pumps at the station and trying to be on the outer side. I do not stare at the pump while filling up, but I am aware of what’s going on around us.

Navigating safely

Over the years me and my wife have learned to work together as driver-navigator. It is nothing complicated, but she knows to use her phone and check for traffic ahead. She knows to look for alternate routes as well. This took some practice but we learned it during one long trip and has since proved beneficial. Our dedicated gps does not adjust for traffic, but her phone app can show us real time traffic conditions. When she drives, we trade jobs and she gets these info on demand from me.
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No traffic in Dallas at 2:19am
This also helps us to pick locations of restaurants if we are getting food. We can pick ones that are along the way and not have to take long detours. She can also confirm weather on our route ahead. For example, we saw it was supposed to rain by lunch time in OK, so we set a goal to get past certain cities before the rain came. Passing thru cities, the highways get slower and denser, so having that behind us before rains started would make for less stress.

Last bits of advice

With relatively small planning, these long trips have become quite relaxing for us. It gives me and my wife time to just sit and talk while the kids are sleeping and strapped in. Sometimes we drive a route that offers better views than the interstate-if we are making good on time or if we are early. Initially these long drives were quite stressful, there was always some big thing we had not prepped for. We kept mental and written notes of previous issues and future trips have become easier. The main thing for us is to be self sufficient during the trip. This means food, water, gas, portable bathrooms even, and inflight entertainment. If we have these and if we set them up for comfortable access then half the battle has been won. If there are external factors that are unlikely-we can pick a different route, or we can stop somewhere.
Take some time to plan the trip and think things through. Make a list of both big picture things and small details. The biggest improvement on this trip of ours was that I had a ccw and we felt safer knowing that I was armed. The best changes that made the most noticeable improvements were the food preps and entertainment.
I hope these ideas prove useful for you. If you have other suggestions please add them in the comments. I am constantly learning and I am always open to ideas.

Gifts for family resilience

Christmas is here and I am trying to avoid cramming last minute shopping for gifts. I would like the gifts to have long term meaning for me and my family. Aaand since I encourage my family to live a better lifestyle-I am always looking for gifts that will lead us to resiliency . Here are some cool ideas for both parents and kids. Please note I have not tried out all of these, but they are some ideas I am considering for my own family.

For the kids:

  1. $$ A subscription to kid activities that will entertain and educate them. Some products that come to mind are Kiwicrate.com and Mystembox.com. Both these sites provide you with a kit that teaches you about science and technology.chromatography_current
  2. $$ Select apps that will educate your kids. We have Toca Builders and Minecraft-both allow my son to create in a 3D world. I plan to supplement this and increase my sons spatial skills
  3. $$ Ebooks-these are great for bedtime stories and road trips. Be selective and find stories that inspire critical thinking and problem solving.
  4. $$ Legos are always good as it helps kids imagine and build. However, sometimes their excitement for these have already worn out and you might need to raise the bar to the next one-which just might mean….
  5. $$ Robot kits-be age appropriate or you will be dealing with a few tantrums. There are options as to how complex the kit is. Some start from the smallest pieces (like Lego EV3 robots) and some have bigger pre-assembled parts. Most kits allow some type of programming, and all kits come with instructions(Hooray!)robot-kits-for-adults
  6. $$ A martial arts class that will focus on character building, respect and discipline. Some parents are wary of martial arts class for kids because of potential damage to their softer bones, but there are options. Most kids are interested in martial arts at an early age-mostly from movies and cartoons. It would be good to channel that interest into something productive. They may make friends and learn respect and discipline.
  7. $$ BB gun-if you feel comfortable and if your kids are old enough you might consider a bb gun. Use this to teach them about gun safety and respect for the tool. It will encourage being in the outdoors and teach the value and results of practicing. If your kids are younger, consider lower powered bb guns (check the “feet per second” or “fps” on the box) If your kids are younger still, maybe a Nerf gun is appropriatered-rider-daisy-tin-1000-web
  8. $$ Books are also a great option and some focus on topics that promote resilience. You will need to be selective to find the right book. Most sites provide book reviews to help you. Perhaps you can find books that help deal with frustrations, facing challenges or learning new things.

For the lady of the house:

  1. $$ Martial arts classes – We have been planning on my wife getting martial arts classes, this way she can start it in January after the holidays (this works for the man of the house too. I am mainly listing it here because I’ve had some already and my wife is next in line to get some training.) She was always hesitant to this until we went to an all woman’s starter self defense class. The sensei was very informative and gave actionable ideas which got her interested.
  2. $$$ If we had the money we would get her CCW permit-then again this is not restricted to Christmas. This for us is really more of a budget issue than it is a timing issue.
  3. $$$ Bike, running shoes or exercise gadgets (a Fitbit)to get her started on her exercise routine. Sometimes people are looking to start new things and need a push, an excuse or inspiration.surge-2016-0fd2880053305928cdaf399527734bcf
  4. $$ My wife likes to knit and sew, a gift card to one of her favorite hobby stores is a good idea. It puts her in the creative mood and it always comes back to the home. The idea is to nurture a productive hobby. I find that this is sometimes better (and easier) than getting her an actual item from that store-unless I really know what she is looking for.
  5. $$ An online class-there are month long classes and there are mini-classes. The price range varies, but there are classes for just about anything. You can find some cool classes on sites like Skillshare, Smallfarmacademy.com or if you have a profession she is already interested in you can check those out also.
  6. $$ A dutch oven might be a good idea if the lady loves to cook. It lets you experiment with a whole new set of recipes and later on is an alternative way to cook without your oven.flamedutchoven
  7. $$ to $$$ Gardening supplies for spring-never too early to plan for that spring garden. These can be tools, seeds, trees or even a bird bath to encourage habitat.
  8. $$ An indoor herb planter-it skips the slow stage of starting up an herb garden but lets you jump right in to learning to use and appreciate the herbs you have. Stick to some herbs you know you are likely to use.

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For the man of the house(I will try to not go crazy on my wish list):

  1. $$$ Additional firearms training (this works for the lady of the house too)
  2. $$ Gardening supplies for spring. In my case, this would be an irrigation system, but this varies. Mom has her list and so do I.847976f2-9565-4ff8-a585-fb56bdaae6a1_1000
  3. $$ Credits for audiobooks for learning new things-Audiobooks have been a great source of learning for me. I like books, but due to time restraints I have moved to audiobooks which allow me to listen to them during my daily commute.
  4. $$ Outdoor cooking gear – a camping stove and propane tank. This doesn’t need to be the latest charbroil high end grill+smoker combo. But if you don’t have an alternative way to cook other than an indoor stove, this might be a great add to your home. It brings everyone out of the house and sparks a time to bond over a  meal. (Obviously using this will need to wait til the weather gets warmer) This is also a great backup if your house relies on electricity for cooking. In the event of a blackout, you will be able to save the food in your fridge and still stick to your diet.
  5. $$ Powertools! I almost forgot but this is always a good option if the husband is inclined to building. Sometimes, the tools are just fun to use that it gives you an excuse to try to build something.61pwvgiefkl-_sl1500_
  6. $$$ A First aid class (basic or advanced). Everyone should know CPR and ways to treat wounds. Usually the schedule for this needs to be worked out, but with some planning it an be done. A budget to build your own kit is also useful.
  7. $$$ A good self defense knife-having a knife is a given in my opinion. It gives you options in a defensive situation. Hopefully you will never need to use it, but if you ever do it should be reliable.
  8. $$ A small utility knife-sometimes your self defense knife is just not worth cutting up packaging and gummying it up with tape. A utility knife can be one that fits into your keychain or can be a neck knife.
  9. $$ Bread maker – if the man likes to cook, perhaps a bread maker is a good option. It reduces the mess and makes baking bread a bit more convenient.

 

Some of the items listed are not very exciting-like the audiobooks for example. But, as they purchase the books through the course of weeks, they will be glad to have those credits. The benefits will be long lasting and is really a way to invest in one’s self.
If you have noticed, some of the ideas are not specific. These are not gadget specific gifts, these offer more of an idea on what gift types can promote learning, improving oneself or gain a new skill. The ideas are also interchangeable between mom and dad depending on interests or current skills.
Also, livestock did not make it in the list. I mean, winter is just a bad time for starting it anyway right?
If you have other suggestions or gifts you wish your spouse thought of, please feel free to post it below. I can definitely update the list as I know I probably missed some really good ideas.

Finding a website name and getting a site up under $50

 

I have been going back and forth on what to name the blog, as I get closer to doing an actual website. Just some quick notes on researching key words, setting up the site and trying to make it easy to find on searches. I plan to run the site under a $50 a year budget.

Godaddy domain name = $35 for 2 years
hosting = approx $10 per year

resources:
http://www.godaddy.com
http://www.bubweb.com

Road trip: Convoy tips for families

We have been traveling quite a lot, and on more than a few occasions we find ourselves with another family in a separate car. Sometimes it is on our turf, other times it is on theirs. Either way, we have learned some practical convoy techniques. This blog will be short and sweet, so here we go:

Each car must have the same address of the destination
Sounds very basic, but keep in mind if you get separated the following vehicle’s first reaction goes kinda like “Oh crap now I have to catch up or I might miss the turn/exit” or panic and just try to catch up. Having the knowledge that you can all get there with a gps reduces this stress

Communicate stops/breaks
This way if you decide you want to get some burgers for the kiddos, the other car is not scratching their head why you are taking the wrong exit

The more conservative/careful driver may be better at taking the lead
For me, driving with my kids in the car make me more careful and I take less risks in driving. In a sense I am driving slower for the following car, but we all need to work as a team. You can only be as fast as your slowest team member-in this case that driver sets the pace. If communicated before the trip, the following cars will take note and can anticipate a reasonable speed.

The last vehicle can open up lane changes

changing-lanes
The last car is in the best position to open up lane changes. He can change lanes (one at a time preferably) and each car ahead of him can change lanes in sequence. This is very effective but needs the first car to signal the lane change early on. The signal lights get relayed to the last car and he looks for an opportunity to change lanes. If you are on a freeway waiting for your exit, depending on your speed, you will want the first car to signal the change maybe 2 miles early.

At stop lights, stop signs, give lots of room
These create big gaps in your convoy if not timed right. The car ahead must adjust timing considering if the cars behind can keep up. Do not run thru yellow traffic lights or you risk the car behind you getting cut off.

Cellphones are good, radios are better

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Each time we drive with family in a convoy, we keep wishing we brought a 2 way radio. The main convenience is you hit one button to communicate, and you can do so to the entire convoy. You don’t have to dial someone on the phone and redial for another car. An FRS/GMRS radio would work well for this, and those are fairly inexpensive.

Communicate the route

google-transit
Even when we have given addresses so we all have it on our GPS, we still communicate what route we plan on taking. No specifics, but just so they understand the general pace/route. On our last road trip, I took an exit and stopped for coffee at a small town. While there, I explained to my dad how we will change the route and stay out of the freeway and use the backroads. This implied we would drive slower, but may have a more scenic trip in this place we were exploring.

Lead car checks traffic

driving-in-heavy-traffic
My wife has gotten really good at being my navigator on these trips. Part of the task is checking for traffic ahead before we hit it. This way, we can veer off the freeway and take backroads. Instead of spending 3 hrs at the freeway, we can spend 2 hrs exploring the small towns along the way-less stress and a more pleasant experience.

 

Giveaway: homeschool activity sheets on entrepreneurship & critical thinking

WHAT?

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I am giving away free activity sheets for homeschoolers who are interested in teaching their kids about:
-entrepreneurship
-problem solving
-critical thinking
-resilience

These are aimed at kids from 4 to 7 yo. These will be in pdf format for you to print and do the exercise with.

WHY?

I want to know if there is a desire in the homeschool community to teach on these subjects. If the demand is there, I will gladly provide free materials for 8 weeks (1 per week) to folks who help me validate this business. I do ask for help by giving me some feedback. These are things I really hope to teach to my kids, and perhaps other parents could use some teaching materials on the subject! If there is not a lot of demand/response I will still email you the first set of worksheets for your use. This survey does not capture emails, so I will reach out separately later on for the download link to the worksheets.

Please email me suggestions and questions at resilientdadblog @ gmail dot com.

Thank you!

 

 

Being intentional about finding family time

Brain dump:
Note to self that with all the things I am working to get done, I must not neglect to find time for family. Looking at my day to day, I have about 2 hours during dinner available for quality family time. The plan is to make the most of these 2 hours to have good quality conversation and family bonding. Plan on expanding that time and find more opportunity to make optimal use of what we have.

Hey, if things are going to work, you have to make sure the family is taken cared of.

3D printing for kids-getting my son started

This last weekend was my son’s first foray into 3D. One of my concerns about the changes in the future is how everything will be available in a 3D digital environment. With the growth of 3D printers and virtual reality, I feel it is not too early for my son to try out some 3D software and kind of get his mind to understand how the process works. As with most things software related, one of the key things is to understand how the software communicates and if I can get him to understand some of that, it should make things tons easier.

We started with a fairly easy program called Sketchup. It allows you to draw basic shapes then “pull” them into a 3D figure by giving the 2D shape a height. The software was created by Google maybe 6 years ago and has since been bought by Trimble. It is available for free (there is also an upgraded version for a small price). You can find it here.

Here’s a quick breakdown of what to do to get started:

  1. Download it and install it
  2. Start the software by clicking on Sketchup 2016 (it has this icon) kohtob83zevb2ulvyd10_400x400
  3. Select a template-maybe pick english units so your stuff is in feet & inches
  4. When you get to the workspace/screen to draw on, press “R” for rectangle.
  5. Draw rectangle
  6. Press “P” for pull. Hover on the rectangle (it should be gray/dark blue) Then click on the rectangle and drag your mouse to a height you want.
  7. Play with this command for a bit. draw rectangles on that block you just did, and repeat the pull command (“P”)
A little background about my son. He likes Legos, building blocks, puzzles. He likes putting things together. He’s kind of grown tired of his Legos too so we need to switch him onto some new constructive and educational toy. He has an app called Toca Builders on the Ipad. This app is pretty fun, you control a bunch of goofy robots, each having their own capabilities, and you can build your mini city. My point is that my son is interested in assembling things, either in his imagination or tactile.

So back to Sketchup. Before I showed it to him, I spent a few minutes to draw something that resembled a building. Something easy and blocky and put in some things to manipulate easily so he can play with it.

I then asked him to check out what I did. I did not show him any commands other than the “pull” command which lets you stretch things out from a surface. I had a box drawn on a wall, and using the pull command we pushed it back so it became a recess on the wall and became a window. We messed around a bit. We pulled a similar box from the wall and created a volume that seemed like a bridge. It did not have to be a bridge, he was using his imagination. All I did was give him a scale of what structure I drew.

With the orbit command-or by holding down the mouse wheel, I spun the model about so he can see the other sides of the building. It helped him understand that this was an environment he can manipulate.

Seeing that you can do something cool gets kids really interested. The imagination jumps immediately to what the possibilities are. Obviously I need to keep them balanced and make sure they are not frustrated when he learns he cannot make that super cool metropolis model this morning.

So I put a mouse on (gave him some basic instructions on left click, scrolling and pushing down the wheel) and showed him some hot keys. Also showed him the tools so he can relate the icons to the functions. I then guided him to do some basic things:

  1. Press “R”
  2. Draw a rectangle
  3. Keep drawing on the surface plane (the ground, it is colored gray on the screen)
  4. I pointed out how the cursor shows you 3 lines that correspond to the 3D environment on the software. These are red, green and blue. Blue means you are giving an object dimension/height
  5. Press “P” and hover on the rectangle-it will highlight, meaning it is ready to be manipulated
  6. Drag the highlighted rectangle upwards to give it height
  7. Ta-da!

From there we just kept repeating the process. We did a bunch more boxes and buildings. We can tweak them later, right now it is more of a muscle memory on the mouse and making the tools/hot keys familiar. There was no pressure to get it right, the goal was just to experiment. Obviously do this when you have time to slow down and not be hurried to get results. This is a creative process and will need experimentation.

Here is a quick video about some basic tools

 

The next step from here for us, is to put together a small thingie-anything will work, limited only by his imagination. One for him and one for myself.   We will then take the sketchup model and print it using a 3D printer.   I am thinking that would be awesome-seeing something you made digitally, and then convert that to a gizmo you can touch and use. That would be super cool, a great project for me and my kiddo and it wont really cost us much. If anything the printing might cost me $20 🙂

Cold call results = 2+1 restaurants to test

So this week I have been trying to get back on the urban farm, trying to get it back up and going. (A couple of months ago I lost my last restaurant account and so it has been totally nonprofitable). I think I listed about 15 or so restaurants and just kept calling in the last few weeks. Luckily I got 2 of them to pick up and express interest. I am scheduled to bring them samples next week. I am going to work on those this weekend-actually Friday night. I need to get seeds into the soil. Also, I got a separate email from a previous chef who also used my microgreens. She told me she wanted to get some samples for this new restaurant where she is working at-awesome! That is a potential 3 restaurants in the next 2 weeks. Hopefully one or two of them push thru and sign up for weekly orders.
Cold calling:
A quick thing on how this process works for me. Basically I run a search online for restaurants and check their price range and sometimes their menus. I have been using Yelp, because the reviews there are helpful and the pricing is already shown in one app. It also shows a map of the restaurants so I can sort the calls via area and hit that area in one shot.
So I get a list of restos and then plug them in to Evernote. This lets me run out during office breaks to make my quick calls and not need any notebook/paper or pen to make notes. I do not have a lot of time to fuss, so I have to be efficient. I have all my real time updates on my phone right after I am done with the call. Here is a sample of the list with my notes on it:
resto-calls
So from the screenshot above, I had my original contact info. Sometimes menu notes. Then I do my calls during office breaks. Right afterwards, the notes I add are highlighted. I can schedule follow up calls on my calendar and keep track of progress. It is very light on my workload done this way, but I do need to transfer notes to a more permanent location when I have enough. Usually this is a spreadsheet on my Google drive.
Anyway, so tonight I will be planting my crops and soaking my seeds.
Also, this weekend I will be changing the oil in our jeep. I know it’s a tiny thing, but I am building knowledge on how to fix/maintain my own vehicle. One of the first things I learned was oil change.
Will also be redoing our living room coffee table. We have been scheming on what to do with this old piece of furniture that my wife got at the local thrift store. We thought we would change the glass top of it to planks of wood and try something different with it. It’s pretty cool, these types of projects have gotten my wife working with tools. She has learned a bunch of new things on her own. I try to just be there to consult and let her find her own initiative.
Update: Saturday 7am
I got up early and planted the microgreen samples. I wasted some time cleaning up the work table I have to do this in. The last few weeks of inactivity for the farm resulted in us dumping crap from other projects onto my farm work table. A ton of stuff there was from the scavenge trip we did at that end of the garage sale. I did a tray of each crop I have. I am done planting now & will be working on the blog for a bit.
micros-in-tray

A branding question

Today, a branding question, a business question. If you are also interested in building your own business, this may be a useful question to ask yourself.

As part of my path to building a resilient future for me and my family, I have been scheming to build a business. This blog is my latest project in fact. Having my own businesses will let me spend more time with my family, and will let me be more adaptable to the changes I am anticipating in the years ahead-with society and with the economy.

Tonight I was doing research on what to name the site, how to brand what I am building. I know it has a name for wordpress and youtube. If I had to change it, I could. It is really early and if it helps me in any way I can afford the change now. I had planned on running an ad and see which received more hits. I read about this from Tim Ferris’ 4 hour Work Week. He used Google ads to test hits on 3 or so other names for the book. (I read the other options, he picked the right one). Tonight I was reviewing what useful keywords should I have for the book. It was a very short list.

Apparently not a lot of people search for resilient + dad. Pretty much there was not a lot of hits for resilient at all-at least not in the context I was expecting. Most of it was related to recovery and therapy. Further down the 1.9Million hits, there were also results for how to raise resilient kids. It also linked to Peak Prosperity’s page but the forum was not very active. Another indication perhaps that the keywords were not great for the context we both thought of. At least at some point there was a connection. It just seemed there was not a strong enough word association to it.

After some time I realized I was going around in circles. What I found was pretty much definitive. Resilient, as of today, is not very highly associated to self reliant, being adaptable and…resilient living. I just could not think of any better word-sorry for the circular reasoning bit.

The question I had then was this:

Being that I know that my goals and context are best defined as resilience and considering that the rest of the internet world does not think of it that way, do I stick to it? Or do I change my words so that they better associate to what the current society is looking at right now?

Do you change the core value that is part of the name, so that you can reach the market-and then maybe return them back to the core value you started with? Or do you assume that at some point, people will realize that your definition of the word, and the context you offer, actually is what they were looking for. And then find that market thru other actions and words instead of just the original keywords:resilient?